Tips, questions, and suggestions
Sign up for emails
IraqSide:Developments
UNDER FIRE
Two Killed in Green Zone Mortar Attacks
Coordinated Barrage by Unknown Militants Leaves Ten Injured
05/16/2007 9:53 PM ET
A US Army Apache helicopter drops flares as hovers over the fortified green zone in Baghdad, on April 12, 2007, after a bomb killed a Iraqi MP inside the Parliament cafeteria.
Photo by Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP.
A US Army Apache helicopter drops flares as hovers over the fortified green zone in Baghdad, on April 12, 2007, after a bomb killed a Iraqi MP inside the Parliament cafeteria.
A coordinated mortar attack struck Baghdad’s Green Zone Wednesday, killing at least two Iraqis and injuring at least ten people.

At least one of the dead appeared to be a driver for the staff of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, according to Iraqi security officials, the AP writes.

At least ten shells fell on the heavily fortified area around 4pm local time, the AP reports.

The shells are believed to be 122 mm, crashing in over a three-minute period. The explosions were so close together in space and time that it is believed that an experienced mortar crew launched the shells, using more than one launcher.

The location of the mortar crew during the launching of the shells is also unknown.

US officials did not comment on the attacks, AP reports.

The US Institute of Peace said its Green Zone office suffered “significant” damage from shrapnel, the AP reports. The organization did not experience any causatlies among its staff.

There were no Americans killed or wounded, and none of the dead or wounded worked for the US embassy, McClatchy reports. Some of the injured appear to be non-American foreigners.

Mortar and rocket attacks on the Green Zone have been a more frequent occurrence of late. Nine people were wounded in an attack on Tuesday, and four contractors were killed on May 3.

Other recent security violations have included the bombing in the convention center that houses the Iraqi Parliament that killed an Iraqi member of parliament in April.

Three State Department officials told McClatchy that they would like the US to reduce its personnel levels at its large embassy complex in order to remove staff out of harm’s way.

SloggerHeadlines






































































Wounded Warrior Project