Tips, questions, and suggestions
Sign up for emails
StateSide:Policy
Full Report PDF
SIGIR Slams State's Oversight of DynCorp
Financial Records in "Disarray" Makes Full Audit Impossible
10/23/2007 4:51 PM ET
FALLUJAH, Iraq: An International Police Liaison Officer (IPLO) hired by US security company DYNCORP to help build the Iraqi police force walks among the rubble of a police station in the city of Fallujah, October 2005.
Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty
FALLUJAH, Iraq: An International Police Liaison Officer (IPLO) hired by US security company DYNCORP to help build the Iraqi police force walks among the rubble of a police station in the city of Fallujah, October 2005.

The State Department "does not know specifically what it received for most of the $1.2 billion in expenditures under its DynCorp contract," Stuart Bowen, State Department's Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction writes in an audit report released Tuesday.

DynCorp was awarded a massive, multi-year contract to provide training to the Iraq police force in early 2004, and SIGIR reports it has had little oversight since the program's inception.

The contract was to be managed by the Department's Bureau of Narcotics and Law Enforcement, which undertook the endeavor without expanding its staff, leaving only one program officer tasked with oversight of DynCorp's work.

SIGIR was unable to complete a full audit because the companies' records are inaccurate or missing, "They were in such disarray that it prevented us from reaching any meaningful conclusions," Stuart Bowen said Monday.

IraqSlogger's David Phinney reported back in March on one of DynCorp's major subcontractors' practice of further sub-contracting its responsibilities to other companies, though reaping massive profit for the simple act of "flipping" the contract.

With the total value of DynCorp's contract now exceeding $1.3 billion, waste likely seeped out in many directions, but a portion of it looks to have ended up in the bank accounts of The Sandi Group.

Read SIGIR's interim review of DynCorp spending on the Iraqi police program: 07_016.pdf

SloggerHeadlines






































































Wounded Warrior Project