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StatCrunch:Opinion Poll
Poll Results
Public Sees Signs of Progress in Iraq
AP/Ipsos Poll Reports New Optimism, Though Deep Discontent Remains
12/11/2007 10:19 AM ET
Demonstrators march against the Iraq war 27 October 2007 in Los Angeles, California.
Gabriel Buoys/AFP/Getty
Demonstrators march against the Iraq war 27 October 2007 in Los Angeles, California.

Americans perceive signs of progress popping up in Iraq over recent weeks, according to a new AP/Ipsos poll. Despite a small spike in optimism, however, the number of those who say it was a mistake to ever go into Iraq remains an unmoved majority.

A small majority of those polled, 52 percent, reported that the U.S. is making progress in Iraq. In September 2006 when AP-Ipsos last asked the question, only 39 percent saw signs of progress.

Roughly three quarters of those surveyed describe themselves as worried about what's happening in Iraq and almost 60% reported feeling angry--slightly less than when the question was asked in February, but still strong majorities.

Americans were evenly split on the question of whether or not the troop surge has helped stabilize the country, with 50 percent saying no and 47 percent yes. However, only 32% believe sending additional troops to Iraq at this point would help the situation, while 64% think it would be a mistake.

Though not yet in the public opinion majority, those who think the surge has brought greater stability increased 11 points from when it was asked three months ago.

Even so, 58% still say it was a mistake for the US to go to war in Iraq, while 38% say it was the right decision, numbers that have remained stable the six times the question has been asked since July 2006. More than half still believe history will judge the war to have been a failure.

The poll relied on phone interviews with 1,009 adults between Dec. 3-5, and had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.

Read the full AP/Ipsos report here act_dsp_pdf.pdf

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