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GI Was Killed in A'dhamiya, Locals Say
Residents: "Northern Baghdad" Attack in Sunni District; Fears of Harsh Response
By SLOGGER NETWORK, GREG HOADLEY 08/28/2008 6:41 PM ET
Baghdad's northeastern A'dhamiya district.
Google Earth image/IraqSlogger.com.
Baghdad's northeastern A'dhamiya district.

Residents of Baghdad’s A'dhamiya district told IraqSlogger that a US soldier was killed by a shooting attack on Monday in the area.

Locals in the northern Baghdad district, on the eastern banks of the Tigris River, report that gunfire from an unknown source struck a member of a US patrol squad on what appeared to be routine operations in A'dhamiya in the area near the Nishmiya Mosque.

US forces have not confirmed the death of any US soldier in A'dhamiya on Monday. However, Multinational Forces released a statement on Monday announcing that a Coalition soldier died that day from wounds sustained in “small-arms attack during a dismounted patrol in northern Baghdad.” The MNF statement did not offer any more details about the circumstances of the attack.

The MNF said that the soldier was rushed to a Coalition Forces Combat Army Support Hospital and succumbed there to injuries. The soldier’s name has been withheld pending notification of next of kin.

Slogger sources in A'dhamiya suggest that the fatal attack in northern Baghdad announced by the MNF occurred in their district.

Locals in the predominantly Sunni Arab area add that American forces closed off that section of A'dhamiya after the attack occurred, preventing vehicles from entering the sealed-off perimeter, and imposed security restrictions in the days following the attack.

Some residents left A'dhamiya, locals say, fearing that US forces would launch harsh search operations in the area following what residents say was the fatal attack.

Members of IraqSlogger's network of Iraqi staff contributed to this report but choose to remain anonymous for security reasons.

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