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US Papers Tue: U.S. Embassy Opens
The World’s Largest Foreign Mission is Open for Business!
By DANIEL W. SMITH 01/06/2009 01:58 AM ET
A frightfully puny amount of original Iraq-related material, with the first day in recent memory without a single article even loosely making the grade in the New York Times. All we have today are two brief accounts of the opening of the US Embassy opening ceremony in Baghdad.

From Baghdad
The Washington Post's uncredited account of the opening ceremony for the $700 Million U.S. Embassy in Baghdad reads more like a Walter Winchell review of a society function than a news report, but perhaps that’s fitting. It is entitled “On the Tigris, America’s Monument to Humility”, which gives an idea of the tone.

After writing that “everyone that was anyone was there, the following was added.
Well, maybe not everyone. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, just back yesterday from schmoozing with the Iranians, skipped the event. He was also a no-show for the ceremony last week turning over the Green Zone to Iraqi control.
“Schmoozing?”

The Christian Science Monitor comes through with Tom A. Peter giving a few more facts (like that there was more than 300 feet of red carpet laid for the ribbon-cutting affair), and not being too dull either.
Just inside the gateway of the new United States Embassy in Baghdad, a US Army lieutenant colonel acted as the diplomatic equivalent of a Wal-Mart greeter, welcoming guests Monday afternoon to the dedication ceremony for the largest – and most expensive – American mission in the world.
The 104-acre compound, often called “hulking” or “ostentatious”, is completely self-sustaining, with its own water well and power generator. Peter adds that “It can also use city services if available.”

Well, sorry... but that’s it today.

New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, no Iraq coverage.

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